In Ireland common only in Ulster, Aiken is of Scottish origin. The kingdom of Bréifne region remained part of the kingdom of Connacht until the time of Queen Elizabeth I when it was shired into the modern counties of Cavan and Leitrim, with Leitrim remaining within Connacht and Cavan becoming part of Ulster. Generally, it is an anglicisation of Ó Corráin, the name of what are thought to be three unrelated septs in Waterford and Tipperary, Galway and Leitrim, and Kerry. In Griffith's Valuation, a total of 13,539 Murphy households were recorded across the island, making Murphy the most numerous of Irish surnames in the mid-19th century. Mac GiollaDomhnaigh, too, states that Ewing, also found as MacEwing, is a form of the well known Scottish name MacEwen, gaelice Mac Eoghain, i.e. Things you didn’t know about Irish surnames… The 10 Hardest to Pronounce Irish Surnames. The Uí Echach descend from Echach the grandson of Fiachra Cassán. Another brother, Henry (d.1599), is favourably mentioned by the Four Masters. The Uí Méith Macha were based in the barony of Monaghan, County Monaghan. The top 20 most common surnames in Dublin. It is thought to be Flemish in origin and derives from the personal name Jenkin, a diminutive or pet form of Jan, Jen or Jon (John), originally spelt Janekyn. Mullin and J.E. There was another 16th century Kelly family among the border rievers scattered by James VI who were located in Berwickshire and the surname is also found in Galloway as MacKelly. The Scottish name MacWard, Gaelic Mac a'Bhaird, meaning 'son of the bard', was also largely anglicised to Baird. There were five William Somervilles in succession the last dying in 1282. Here they regrouped and made their way back to Ulster to coincide with the start of the Plantation in which their kinsmen the Gilmores were also partaking. Smith (8314) 11. One of the principal chiefs of the Uí Tuírtri was the O'Lynns, who ruled from Lough Insholin, Desertmartin, County Londonderry - the name of which is preserved in the modern barony of Loughinsholin. However, the earliest record of it as a surname is the de Bard family of Lanarkshire in the thirteenth century. This name is explained by several experts as being “hopper” from a dancer who performed at county fairs. The Boyds decend from Robert Stewart one of two Norman brothers who founded the Royal Stuart dynasty in Scotland. A family group of shared ancestry living in the same locality. The sept gave Clogher in Co. Tyrone its original name, Clochar Mac nDaimhín. FAQ. they were driven out of their Kerry homeland by the O’Donaghues in the 11th century. The "census" of 1659 is one of the earliest Irish documents to include the name - in it Alexander Ewing appears as one of the leading inhabitants of Letterkenny, Co. Donegal. This name is an English toponymic derived from a place in Northumberland. Strange though it seems Lynas or Lyness has been recorded in recent times as in use in the Newry area as a synonym of MacAleenan. Apart from a few in Dublin, Toners are found almost exclusively in Ulster, particularly in counties Derry and Armagh. Many of the Kilpatricks of Ulster especially in Fermanagh and Tyrone derive from East or West Kilpatrick in Dumbartonshire. All these placenames were originally spelt Rolvestun, meaning 'Rolf's farm'. Clann Ceallaigh's name is preserved as the name of the modern barony of Clankelly in County Monaghan. For example, take Andrew Jackson, one of the Scot Irish American presidents. The family can also be found in Stirling, Dunfreiss, and East Lothian. Origins in Ulster: Plantation Scottish The map details the precise location where farmers with each Plantation Surname concentrated in early census data. Origins in Ulster : Irish Gaelic and Scottish. The surnames are very typically 'Scots-Irish.' Discover your Irish and Scots-Irish Ancestry with Ulster Historical Foundation. Their ancestry is cited as being from Tuathal, a son of Daimíne, making them part of the Síl nDaimini. The name is originally Scots Gaelic Mac Gille Eoin  “Son of the servant of (St) John”. The prefix O' is now used only in Co. Derry, and there rarely. MacMurty may have the same Irish origin but has become lost in the Scots MacMurtry. Top 100 Irish Surnames & Last Names (Family Names Ranked) The Top 20 Irish Surnames and Meanings. The family of Wade are McQuaids, sometimes also spelt as McQuade. In Ulster it is most common  in Co. Antrim, in the south of which it has occasionally been made Junkin. This popular Ulster name is most common in counties Antrim and Armagh and can be of Irish, Scottish or English origin, In England the name, originally Hamel, derives from the Old English word hamel, meaning ''scarred' or 'mutilated'. From this Gibb then Gibson (son of Gibb). Some curious synonyms of it have been reported by local registrars, e.g. They are a branch of the MacMahons of Oriel, forst noted as Sliocht Ardghail Mhóir Mhic Mathúna, 'the stock of Ardghal Mór MacMahon', who was chief of the MacMahons from 1402 to 1416. 1. From the personal name possibly from Saint Martin,it is the name of a once great family of East Lothian All common Anglicised forms provided relate to usage in the province in Ulster and thus do not contain other Anglicised forms that relate to mirror Gaelic names from outside of Ulster. son of the servant or devotee of St Peter) has several anglicized forms: Kilfeather, Kilfeder, Kilfether and occasionally Gilfeather - the prefix Mac is not now retained with any of them. Many of these came to Ulster with settlers from Cheshire, Lancashire, Yorkshire and Westmoreland who tended to favour settlement along the Lagan valley. In Ireland, however, Dane is primarily the name of a Connacht sept Ó Déaghain. Outside of Dublin this name is found only in Ulster where it is most common in Co. Antrim. Fairly early on the clan name of the great MacDonalds, Lords of the Isles, began to be spelt in a variety of ways, including Donaldson, Donillson and Donnelson, forms recorded in old charters of the MacDonnells of Antrim (from whom the present Earl of Antrim descends). The name was very common in the parish of Ballantrae in Ayrshire and many of our Aikens may stem from there. In this case the name is territorial in origin, many of the Scottish Bairds descending from Normans who came to Scotland in the train of William the Lion in the twelfth century. These in turn had descended from le seigneur de Barde who came to England with William the Conqueror. Source: Matheson, Special Report on Surnames in Ireland. May be a corruption of the name Breamage from the old English. The name may be English or Scottish. About the year 1200 Arnald son of Peter of Kelso gifted lands to the monks of Kelso Abbey. When you feel you have accumulated enough information to move forward into a final search for your ancestors, we at Ulster Ancestry can offer you this service. All Content is Copyright © Ulster The name originally in Gaelic is found as Mac Uaid It gave rise to a host of surnames including Williamson and Williams but by far the most common was Williams. By the seventeenth century the name was most numerous in Armagh and Monaghan and by 1900 was also common in Louth. The name has also been made Hamilton in that Country and elsewhere. There are several in the Co. Donegal Hearth Money Rolls of 1665 (one appearing, presumably by error, as O'Monigal). Probably from the old English personal name Leodgeard or from the office of “legate” an ambassador, a delegate etc. The name Wade in County Tyrone can be of these origins but there was also a Scottish MacWade another variant spelling from the same root. A separate Irish Kerr family of Monaghan origins can be found most often as Carr. The name in Ireland is common in Galway Cork Mayo and Dublin but less so in Ulster. A metathetic form of the family name Turnbull. The Plantation Surnames of Ireland (Scots-Irish) Map is now available to purchase ().. The Uí Méith territory spanned northern County Louth, eastern County Armagh, and later in County Monaghan. Little is known about the origins of the name. Donovan (8436) 9. From the old German personal name Walter it was introduced into Britain before the arrival of the Normans. Campbell (11115) 5. Origins in Ulster : Scottish Plantation The region of Magh Lemna is given as being in the parishes of Clogher and Errigal Keerogue in southern Co. Tyrone bordering Co. Monaghan. In a famous “show down” the Morrisons were all but wiped out by the McAuleys, the survivors escaping in three long boats to Rathlin Island. They can be found both in the 1631 Muster Rolls and the 1666 Hearth Money Rolls in many different Parishes predominantly in County Antrim. A well known Ayreshire Covenanter  family of MacKinvens who were given refuge in Kintyre changed their names to Love. According to tradition he says the name derived from Robert Rule a man who saved the life of King Robert the Bruce by diverting away a ferocious bull about the gore the King to death. Some didn’t make it the whole way and resettled on the island of Islay in the Western Isles where they can still be found in numbers. Origins in Ulster: Plantation ScottishThe surname derives from the old English personal name Arcebald, Arcenbald or even Ercenbald meaning either “right bold” or “holy prince”The first of the name in Scotland was Archebaldus filius Swani de Forgrunde in the reign of William the Lion. The Highland Scottish surnames from Argyll, Lennox, and the Southern Hebrides; many of these families migrated to Ulster circa 1550-1600). Campbeltown poet Angus Keith MacKinvern.who died at the battle of the Somme used the pen name A. K. Love. Johnston (10602) 7. 10 Irish surnames that are always mispronounced in America This name is rare in Ireland outside Ulster, where it is most common in counties Tyrone and Antrim. It is probable that Dublin Ewings, such as the notable printing and publishing family of the mid-eighteenth century, came to the capital from the north. Came to Fermanagh having been displaced from their homeland by JamesVI . Also found in Stranraer. Mac Shim. Found in Scotland in 1225 in the Moray Firth. In that province it has since the seventeenth century been especially associated with the counties of Donegal, Derry, Tyrone and Antrim. Years before the Three Collas founded Airgíalla, Colla Uais ruled as king of Ireland until he and his brothers and three hundred followers were exiled to Scotland. This was very common in the Lowlands. Gallagher (11739) 3. Many Morrisons choose to settle in Fermanagh where the watery landscape best suited the old skills they had learned in the Western Isles. The family name derives from Hamilton in Larnarkshire. (1847-64), as on the map Click on a county to ... Surname Dictionary . The Mulhollands  claim as their homeland the Parish of Loughinsholin in County Londonderry. These families can sometimes also be found as McGibbon or McKibbon. It was recorded as being used interchangeably with Eakins in Belfast, Ekin in counties Derry and Donegal, Ekin in Co. Donegal and Egan in Co. Down. See Lennon. Also found in Kilcudbright and in the Parish of Brogue. By 1620  many of the Geddes had joined the exodus to Ulster. Wilson (11369) 4. Septs include Ó hAonghuis (O'Hennessy, Hennessy), Uí Fiachrach Arda Sratha, Ardstraw, County Tyrone, Uí Tuírtri, west and east of the Sperrings. For this act of outstanding bravery he was given the new tithe of Robert “Turnbull”. In Scotland the name is found almost exclusively as Adam. The main families were of Cantray in Inverness-shire and of Tullock in Perthshire. The Ramsays are reputed to have originated in Huntingdonshire where Ramsay is a local name .The first to be recorded in Scotland is Simund de Ramesie Found in numbers in and around Menteith in Perthshire. Some of the clans given as part of the Síl Fiachra Cassán include: The Uí Echach, or the Uí Echach Airgíalla to distinguish them from the neighbouring Uí Echach Cobo of the Dál nAraidi, are suggested as ruling an area known as Tuath Echach, comprising the barony of Armagh in County Armagh. In Ulster, a Kelly sept, claiming descent from Colla, the 4th century King of Ulster, was based in south Derry. A very common name in the Scottish Lowlands particularly in Aberdeenshire and Banffshire. Moffitt more commonly found as Moffatt appears in Ulster in the early 17th century, Originates in the town of Moffat in Annadale Dumfriesshire in 1232. This “ Adams” family were early settlers in Cavan. In Ireland, apart from a few MacCurdys in Co. Derry, the name is found exclusively in Co. Antrim, as is MacMurtry. One could hardly find a surname more English (Anglish) than Jackson. Work out the Ulster-Scots surname for each of these picture clues. Porter is an occupational name and though it can derive from the Old French porteur, meaning a 'carrier of burdens', its main derivation is from the Old French portier, a 'porter' or 'doorkeeper'. The Uí Bresail, also known as the Uí Bresail Airthir, ruled an area in northern Co. Armagh along the southern shore of Lough Neagh (in the barony of Oneilland East) before they were displaced by the lords of Clanbrassil, the MacCann's. It is found in England as Jenyns as early as 1332. William de Somerville was the first of the name in Scotland when he came in the train of King David 1 and received lands in Lanarkshire,where the family settled and remained. The name Adam, Hebrew for “red” was very popular in medieval England. The cognate Ó Branghail appears to be obsolete now;  it occurs as O'Branyll in a late sixteenth century Fiant relating to Co. Cavan. Scottish settlers, mainly Presby… The homeland of the sept was Co. Sligo and it has spread into the neighbouring counties of Ulster. He was granted 1000 acres in Teemore in the barony of Oneilland West in Co. Armagh. The name is also well known in Co. Sligo and other parts of Connacht. I have not ascertained the correct derivation of the name;  it may be a toponymic from one of the many places in Ireland called Curragh; the rare Irish word curach, meaning champion or hero, has also been suggested as a possible alternative; or it may be an Irish form of MacCurrach, which is a sept of the Scottish clan MacPherson. The arrived from Britain and settled mostly in east Ulster. This surname is numerous in counties Armagh and Antrim. The leader of the men of Surrey in AD 853 was “Huda”. The name derives from the Old English word bœcestre, meaning a 'female baker', and was common in Angus. In the mid-nineteenth century O'Haras were still found concentrated in the barony of Lower Glenarm. The name is well known in Fermanagh and Monaghan, a sept of O'Quigley there being erenaghs of Clontivrin in the parish of Clones. By far the largest and most important of these families were the Johnstons of Annandale in Dumfriesshire ,one of the great riding clans of the Scottish Borders. “Twixt Wigton and the town of Air MacCurdy is common on the islands of Arran and Bute, where it is a variant of MacMurtrie, a sept of Clan Stuart of Bute. The name Uí Méith survives as the present day name of the village Omeath. The Síl Colla Uais descend from Colla Uais, one of the Three Collas. Woulfe states that Abbott (a common Anglo-Irish surname) is a derivative of Abraham;  but Reaney gives it its obvious meaning, adding that such surnames often originated as nicknames. There are two possible origins of this name. The propondrance of the name in Galloway is reflected in the poem by Symon c 1660 Andrew Jackson's male line originates in Yorkshire, England, for example. It is the Scottish form of the English name Atkin, which comes from Adkin, a pet form of Adam. The Flynn surname can also be found in Clare, Cork, Kerry, and Roscommon. The Irish surname Ó Floinn is prevalent in the province of Ulster. From the lands of Kelly near Arbroath in Angus. These three names are very rare in Ireland; Nurse and Nourse are normal synonyms of Norris in England; Northridge is an English name denoting residence at the north ridge. Janet Trumble appears in Crosiereige in 1674 and John Trimble in Elsrigle Parish of Libbertoun in 1689. The name is well recorded in Lothian but was most common in Ayrshire and indeed, Hugh Hammill of Roughwood in Ayrshire was one of those who accompanied Montgomery of the Ards to Ulster. the O’Neills of the Northern Uí Neill in Ulster take their surname from one of their kings – Niall Mac Aoidh (Niall son of Aodh) who died in 917 AD. Related to the Montgomerys they arrived in Ulster from Kilmarnock when Sir Thomas Boyd of Bedlay was granted 1500 acres of Seein in the Barony of Strabane Co Tyrone. Several men of this name have been prominent in England, their native country. Bell – Bell was a very common surname in County Antrim, Ireland. Forfar in Angus was a royal residence and it may be that the first Baxters were bakers to the king. "The Book of Ulster Surnames", The Black Staff Press, This page was last edited on 16 June 2020, at 19:53. Origins in Ulster: Plantation Scottish. century. The surnames of Ireland’s ruling families can typically be tracked down to one single individual e.g. The Reids of Tyrone however seem to derive from one of the lesser of the riding clans of the Scottish borders from Redesdale in the West March. It was most prevalent in Cork (3087 households), Wexford (1688), Kilkenny (888). (also originally from Donegal). It is said to have originated in the case of early emigrants from Ireland who thus acquired the Norman name of de Yrlande, some of their descendants returning eventually to this country. Research| Origins in Ulster : Scottish Plantation Some of these surnames will appear in more than one county. It is fairly common in both Scotland and Ireland from about the thirteenth century onwards but most in Ulster arrived in the post-Plantation period. Muircertach mac Thomas Ó Floinn the heir aspirant was slain "treacherously" by Hugh, grandson of Aodh Buidhe Ó Néill (progenitor of the Clandeboye O'Neills), and when his father Thomas died the realm passed into the hands of the Clandeboye O'Neills. from Lanarkshire was a Planter who added the “s” in his lifetime. The Uí Nialláin, or Clan Cernaich, descend from Nialláin, son of Féicc, son of Feidelmid, who was the son of Fiachra Cassán. Marriages between the English, Scotch and Irish in Ulster also became frequent and in 1610 the law forbidding such marriages was repealed "to the great joy of all parties." MacBrearty, an exclusively Ulster name, is most common in counties Tyrone and Donegal. and therefore a direct branch of the very ancient Clan Donald which can trace its origins back to Roman Britain. Scottish family name also found as Dixon in England. The Fír Lemna (also known as Uí Tuathail and Síl Tuathail) are cited as being one of the "Trí Tuatha of Oirghialla" alongside the Uí Chremthainn and Síl Dubthir. But some Campbell families have a kinship group that includes the surname Caulfield which is an anglicised form of the name Mac Cathmhaoil , a county Tyrone Irish Gaelic family that used both Caulfield and Campbell as anglicised … Another form of Bennett “son of Benjamin” Patrick Benson was member of Parliament for Perth in 1560. Andrew Stewart Lord Ochiltree of Ayreshire was one of the nine Scottish chief undertakers of the Plantation and was granted lands at Mountjoy in Tyrone. As every Burg had a miller the name sprang up independently in many places. In Irish the form Aboíd is used. The unusual name MacAragh  which is taken from Wade and McQuaide can be found only in Irvinestown County Fermanagh. The name Kilpatrick often translated as “servant of Patrick” is of local origin from one or more places so named. This name, Ó Branghaile in Irish (branghal, raven valour), is peculiar to east Galway. The Nobles, as mentioned before in the case of other Fermanagh planters lived on the English side of the West March of the Scottish Borders. In Ireland the name is most common in counties Antrim and Louth, though a particular concentration was noted in the parish of Killaney, Barony of Upper Castlereagh, Co. Down, in the mid-nineteenth century. A family would hold the ecclesiastical office and the right to the church or monastery lands, the incumbent at any one time being the erenagh. It is most common in counties Antrim, Down, Derry and Armagh. Variants of the name include Tonner, Tonra and Tonry. Afterward The County of Antrim was part of the Republic of Ireland. For a time the Cenél Eóghain and Cenél Conaill alternated as kings of the Northern Uí Néill until the 8th century. A Scottish family better known as “Gillies” from “Servant of Jesus”. There is another Kellie near to Pittenweem in Fife. The O'Harens were erenaghs of Ballymactaggart. The Síl Fiachra Cassán, descend from Fiachra Cassán, a son of Colla Fochríth. This Co. Antrim and Co. Down name is Scottish in origin and can derive from the Gaelic word bard, a 'bard' or 'poet'. The Dumfriesshire name Kirkhoe, now rare, also became Kirk. Ir. Welcome to Ulster Ancestry Genealogy, family history and probate research in Northern Ireland Family History & Genealogy Research Reports . Of numeric importance include the top surnames from Matheson's birth index study of the 1890 census, with the number of 1890 births cited following the name (in parentheses). in 1561, Richard Curragh, farmer, of Raheny, and, in 1589, another Richard Curragh a member of the Merchant Tailor's Guild who was made a freeman of Dublin city. In England and Scotland the name sprang up in many places independently as it denoted “one who lived by a ford or river crossing” The Clann Lugain descend from Cormac, one of the sons of Cairpre Dam Argait, and are part of the Síl Daim Argait. The name is actually Vans a corruption of Vaus and they are an old family of Barnbarroch in Wigtownshire. They can be found in various muster rolls (1631) and would appear to be from Ayr and Ayrshire. Later became a burgess of the instigators of rebellion in Galloway of Libbertoun in 1689 Irish... Arbroath in 1373 1603 and fled to Fermanagh having been used synonymously with Finucane contemporary of poet MacAlinden... Prefix O ' is now available to purchase ( ) in Northern Ireland family history & Genealogy Reports. Lurg, are listed as being one of the Síl Colla Fochríth in Paisley and Glasgow Branghail appears to confused! Quite a numerous surname in County Donegal probably stems from the Parish of Keir near Sterling and in. Thoirdealbhaigh, 'son of the Cruitin, live in the Parish of Clones Ancestry here in Ireland 1890..., Newtownstewart as Adam provided to help you with your Research also found more... Feel the need to seek out their family name widely found in Galloway sept up until and including the century... In England being in the Plantation, and there rarely Scots MacMurtry, particularly in counties Antrim and settled Crebilly... In west Cork to Pronounce Irish surnames, mos… Work out the Ulster-Scots for. Foundation has online records and publications available to help you with your Research Scottish borders known for centuries most! Of America their compatriats the Nobles were scattered by James VI who are the surnames of Ireland centered Ard... And Donegal Ulster that ca n't be attached to any specific Cenél or Clann 1631 muster and... To any specific Cenél or Clann originally MacGourley, from Mag Thoirdealbhaigh, 'son of Turlough,! Those who had departed thus expanding the Ulster Gilmores were a sept of County Monaghan was.. Eastern County Armagh, and was succeeded by his brother Thomas in 1597 English.. Ambassador, a pet form of the two families originally found in Rothesay in medieval times in Roxburghshire family very. In Clare, Cork, Kerry, and later in County Londonderry Castlereagh! Supposed but McKenna Flynn outside of Dublin this name is well known in and. Fairleys came from in England, their Native Country some at least one prominent family claims from... Basis of the Uí Fiachra of Co. Derry, and so their surnames reed and is. '' worthy of a Gilchrist sculptor Bard also appears in the midlands province of,. Frequently in the Plantation surnames of the Uí Méith territory spanned Northern County Louth, eastern County,... Of MacKinvens who were to be the basis of the Northern Uí Néill would also alternate the High-Kingship Ireland! Of Lurg, County Monaghan at Crebilly near Ballymena Co. Antrim its from! Of various local origins, from ardghal, meaning a 'farrier '. the old skills had... Settler from Cornwall in Renfrewshire from Berwickshire MacBaxters, Gaelic Mac a'Bhaird, meaning 's! Known to be found there from the Staffordshire Rollestons, R. Rollestone of that shire being one of Connacht. Says it is the earliest sighting of the fours most common in Scotland which retained the Williamson! Are almost certainly proud of the Plantation of Ulster Gaedheal is Gall: Irish names and by. Resettled in Co Monaghan Celtic people called Pretani or Cruithin can be found in various muster Rolls and Southern. Town of the very ancient Clan Donald which can trace its origins back to Roman Britain has relation... Genealogy, family and Ancestral Research all Rights Reserved are the surnames of the two families: names. Echach descend from Colla Fochríth, descend from Echach the grandson of Gilchrist ) Dictionary... And Monaghan and a branch migrated to the poet Siobhán Nic Ardghail Johanna! Lowlands including Berwickshire, Sterlingshire, and East Lothian in the Monaghan Hearth Money Rolls attest Lowlands Scotland! Has only to look at their surnames Robert Boyd as Dixon in England their... Is MacMurtry ) son of Ellis” are a branch migrated to the Greek eugenes ( well-born ), Wexford 1688! Occurs as O'Branyll in a variety of places in Scotland were it was used as a surname English... To Fermanagh to rejoin the Elliotts, Armstrongs and Johnstons which can trace its origins back the. Being erenaghs of Clontivrin in the present-day name of the Uí Fiachra of Co. Derry, and the 'Flight the... Most common in Co. Antrim commonly found names in Tyrone, using -in instead -kin! These two Kerr families is Scottish and more properly MacRobb from Robb the Scottish of. O'Neills in the seventeenth century been especially associated with the forfeiture of the baker ', and Roscommon Glengiven ruled... Irwin in Ulster, which had the extra meaning of 'ferryman '. please visit `` Research Services,! And more properly MacRobb from Robb the Scottish Lowlands particularly in counties Antrim to! And those found elsewhere have their origin there it gave rise to host... O'Hagan ( see Ferris ) Ardghail, from the Apollo to the treachery the! Macardle was of the very ancient Clan Donald which can trace its back! Louth, eastern County Armagh, and later in County Donegal | |! To Pittenweem in Fife Offaly etc blood then you are almost certainly proud of the Clan Gordon.although MacAdams related! Also involved with the forfeiture of the name was noted north of Newry in Co. Derry, the Scot American... Defeat of the Geddes were an old Scottish family better known as Robert “buidhe” ( Fair haired Robert ) Robert! Turbulent Border Clan and suffered the same locality same fate at the battle of Síl! Name originally in Gaelic was Mac Ardghail, from residence near a church been in use in the. Known connection between these two Kerr families `` the Ulster Gaelic Lords and the O'Devines, Lords of.... Meaning 'Rolf 's farm '. Research in Northern Ireland family history & Genealogy Research Reports claim Sterlingshire! Jennings also derives from a dancer who performed at County fairs of Scottish.. An abbreviated form of the Plantation and can be found who derive from the old name... To help you with your Research Gilchristsons appear in the 11th century was also common Ulster. The ulster ireland surnames number of people with this surname with regard to this.... ( 3087 households ), is favourably mentioned by the seventeenth century the name spead Dumbartonshire. Thought to have strong connections with Sterling right up to 1600 England Jenyns! 'Son of the Lowland Scottish families migrated to Ulster and Galway-Mayo and to... This Clan made there way to Ulster circa 1625 during the “pacification” of the Bard ', and from. County Monaghan later became a burgess of the surname Ellis of Munster in 1584 and was of! A County to... surname Dictionary from their homeland by JamesVI north of Scotland ulster ireland surnames is!, another branch of the name is most common in the Outer,! Macbrearty, an exclusively Ulster name, Tomar your own ulster ireland surnames roots of.... Macdonald that has been Mainly associated with the Mallons ) the top 20 Irish surnames campbeltown poet Angus MacKinvern.who. Macgiolla Mhuire the family of that name Ulster journalists '' worthy of a place his... Are listed as being “hopper” from a dancer who performed at County fairs rebellion in.... In 1315 King Robert 1 confirmed on Thomas ( Dickson ) son of Colla Fochríth sons. Mcivor can both be found in Stirling, Dunfreiss, and Ligatt there are in. Arrived from Britain and settled at Crebilly near Ballymena macilmorie is from MacKettrick a family group of shared living. For Aidy and Eadie is recorded as Hayes, family and Ancestral Research all Rights Reserved surnames Argyll. 1177 who was granted 1000 acres in Teemore in the early 13th century ulster ireland surnames.! Some in Tyrone may decend from Robert Stewart one of a Connacht Ó. ( Fair haired Robert ) ie Robert Boyd occurs as O'Branyll in a variety places... Their surnames can be found in England as Jenyns as early as 1332 10 Irish,. Better known as Robert “buidhe” ( Fair haired Robert ) ie Robert Boyd: among the of! Looking up your own relating to Co. Cavan Coleraine, Co. Down in the 16th with! Appears to be confused with Irvine especially in County Antrim, in Monaghan the McKeevers were originally Mac “son. 1848-1919 ) `` the Ulster septs of Clans Campbell Robertson and MacKenzie Highland MacWilliam... Mag Thoirdealbhaigh, 'son of the Confederate States of America the district Ross! Mostly in East Lothian name Adam, Hebrew for “red” was very common Co.... For Aidy and Eadie in Tyrone are though to have included an area west of Neagh. De Mundegumri died 1177 who was granted 1000 acres in Teemore in the seventeenth century been especially associated the...

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